Posted MAY 22, 2017


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Incidences of pain in the lower back are rising day by day due to the increasingly sedentary lifestyle and erroneous physical activities and postures. The lower back, or the lumbar region, can be an area that often gets sensitive for most of us at some point in our lives. Whether we have to sit a lot during the day, or whether we move a lot, the lumbar region can get affected. In any case, pain in the lower back can seriously affect your mood and your day.

1. Sphinx pose

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The Sphinx is a great pose for toning the spine and stimulating the sacral-lumbar arch. When we sit a lot, the lower back tends to flatten, which can cause pain. Sphinx pose promotes the natural curvature of the lower back.

Start by laying on your stomach, feet hip-width apart, and bring the elbows under the shoulders. If there is too much pressure on your lower back, you can bring your elbows slightly forward.

If you want a deeper bend, place a block under the elbows. Hold the pose for 1-3 minutes, and come out by first lowering your upper body on to the floor. Relax on the floor as long as needed, and then come to a child pose for few breaths.

2. Spinal Twist

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One of the basic and effective ones is Marichyasana or the spinal twist. Keep your left leg straight and bend your right leg so your foot is flat. Place your right hand on the floor behind you for support, like a tripod, and twist so you can hook your left elbow over the right thigh.

If this is too much, you can also grab hold of your right knee and twist to look over your right shoulder. Other options are to bend the left leg under you or bend both legs and let them fall to the side then twist in whichever way your knees are facing.

3. Triangle Pose

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Back pain can be helped, and in some cases prevented, with stretching and strengthening—and Triangle Pose can do both.

Stand with your feet about three feet apart and parallel to each other. Rotate your right foot so the right heel is in line with the arch of the left foot. With your arms extended to the side, tilt at the hip to reach your right hand toward the ground, on either side of your foot. Rotate your body to the side and point the fingers of your left hand towards the sky.

Gaze at your left hand (as long as it doesn’t hurt your neck!) and hold for five to seven breaths before switching sides.

Pelvic Tilt (strengthens pelvic floor, deep abdominals; stretches lower-back muscles) Lie faceup on floor, knees bent, ankles under knees. Exhaling, gently tilt hips up slightly, keeping butt on floor and flattening spine. Hold for a few seconds, then inhale and return to neutral (starting) position. Do 5 to 10 reps.

When it comes to back pain, prevention is key to a long and pain-free life, but listening to your body is also extremely important. Don’t force any posture that could cause injury. If your pain is extreme, you may want to seek medical attention.